Titanic 1953 [Adventure Drama][1080p HD] Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck & Robert Wagner

Stuck in an unloving marriage, rich socialite Julia Sturges (Barbara Stanwyck) boards the Titanic with her two young children with the intent of divorcing her husband, Richard (Clifton Webb), when she arrives in the States. At the last minute, Richard discovers her plan and manages to get on board the ship in an attempt to convince her to stay with him. Their marital problems take a backseat, however, when the Titanic collides with an iceberg and begins its descent into history.

Today Barbara Stanwyck is remembered primarily as the matriarch of the family known as the Barkleys on the TV western The Big Valley (1965), wherein she played Victoria, and from the hit drama The Colbys (1985). But she was known to millions of other fans for her movie career, which spanned the period from 1927 until 1964, after which she appeared on television until 1986. It was a career that lasted for 59 years.

Barbara Stanwyck was born Ruby Catherine Stevens on July 16, 1907, in Brooklyn, New York, to working class parents Catherine Ann (McPhee) and Byron E. Stevens. Her father, from Massachusetts, had English ancestry, and her Canadian mother, from Nova Scotia, was of Scottish and Irish descent. Stanwyck went to work at the local telephone company for fourteen dollars a week, but she had the urge (a dream–that was all it was) somehow to enter show business. When not working, she pounded the pavement in search of dancing jobs. The persistence paid off. Barbara was hired as a chorus girl for the princely sum of $40 a week, much better than the wages she was getting from the phone company. She was seventeen, and was going to make the most of the opportunity that had been given her.

In 1928 Barbara moved to Hollywood, where she was to start one of the most lucrative careers filmdom had ever seen. She was an extremely versatile actress who could adapt to any role. Barbara was equally at home in all genres, from melodramas, such as Forbidden (1932) and Stella Dallas (1937), to thrillers, such as Double Indemnity (1944), one of her best films, also starring Fred MacMurray (as you have never seen him before). She also excelled in comedies such as Remember the Night (1940) and The Lady Eve (1941). Another genre she excelled in was westerns, Union Pacific (1939) being one of her first and TV’s The Big Valley (1965) (her most memorable role) being her last. In 1983, she played in the ABC hit mini-series The Thorn Birds (1983), which did much to keep her in the eye of the public. She turned in an outstanding performance as Mary Carson.

Barbara was considered a gem to work with for her serious but easygoing attitude on the set. She worked hard at being an actress, and she never allowed her star quality to go to her head. She was nominated for four Academy Awards, though she never won. She turned in magnificent performances for all the roles she was nominated for, but the “powers that be” always awarded the Oscar to someone else. However, in 1982 she was awarded an honorary Academy Award for “superlative creativity and unique contribution to the art of screen acting.” Sadly, Barbara died on January 20, 1990, leaving 93 movies and a host of TV appearances as her legacy to us.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson

Trivia

During the boarding of the lifeboats, Norman changes seats with a woman who arrives at the last moment when the boat was completely full. This was inspired by the action of a Mexican passenger in first class named Manuel Uruchurtu, who did the same thing to a woman from second class who was refused a seat on the lifeboat. After he gave up his seat to her, he asked her to travel to Mexico, if she survived, and tell his wife what happened. His body was never found.

The filming of the disaster had a powerful effect on Barbara Stanwyck, who recalled: “The night we were making the scene of the dying ship in the outdoor tank at Twentieth, it was bitter cold. I was 47 feet up in the air in a lifeboat swinging on the davits. The water below was agitated into a heavy rolling mass and it was thick with other lifeboats full of women and children. I looked down and thought: If one of these ropes snaps now, it’s goodbye for you. Then I looked up at the faces lined along the rail – those left behind to die with the ship. I thought of the men and women who had been through this thing in our time. We were re-creating an actual tragedy and I burst into tears. I shook with great racking sobs and couldn’t stop.

To ensure authenticity, the producers recruited a former captain of the Queen Elizabeth as a technical consultant, and no background music was played during the feature film-the only music heard was that of the musicians aboard the ship.

The character of Maude Young, portrayed in this motion picture by Thelma Ritter, was obviously based upon Mrs. J.J. “Unsinkable Molly” Brown of Denver, Colorado. Even though the actual names of some of the other passengers were used in the film, Mrs. Brown’s was not. It has been suggested that there was some dispute between 20th Century Fox and the Brown estate over the use of Molly Brown’s character. Therefore, Molly Brown of the Denver, Colorado gold silver mining fortune became, for this motion picture, Maude Young of Montana lead mining.

Opening credits prologue: All navigational details of this film — conversations, incidents and general data — are taken verbatim from the published reports of inquiries held in 1912 by the Congress of the United States and the British Board of Trade.

Some of the original Titanic survivors were invited to a tear-filled special screening of the film in New York.

Many of the sets (including the ship model) were reused for several other films after this such as Dangerous Crossing (1953) and in particular the dining room, cabins, grand staircase, lounge, radio room, boat deck, promenade deck and the deck chairs. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) used the ship model (remodified), the dining room walls, the lounge, the promenade deck, and the deck chairs again. A Blueprint for Murder (1953) the ship model (remodified), the dining room, promenade deck and deck chairs were all reused again. Then finally in Woman’s World (1954), which also starred Clifton Webb only the dining room walls were used. The ship model is displayed at the Marine Museum of Fall River in Fall River, Massachusetts.

The Illusionist – Full Movie

Set in early 1900s Vienna, illusionist extraordinaire Eisenheim (Edward Norton, “American History X”) falls for an aristocrat (Jessica Biel, “Total Recall”) well above his social standing. The master magician employs his powers to win her love and his daring scheme creates tumult within the monarchy and ignites the suspicion of Chief Inspector Uhl (Paul Giamatti, “Sideways”).

It is based loosely on Steven Millhauser’s short story “Eisenheim the Illusionist“. The film tells the story of Eisenheim, a magician in turn-of-the-century Vienna, who reunites with his childhood love, a woman far above his social standing. The film also depicts a fictionalized version of the Mayerling incident.

In 1900s Vienna, mesmeric entertainer Eisenheim’s magical abilities are wowing the crowds, with an act that ranges from mere tricks to an apparent capacity to raise the dead. However, he has also long been in love with Duchess Sophie von Teschen, which puts him in dangerous competition with the violent, scheming Crown Prince Leopold, who jumps at the opportunity to have the magician arrested grounds of necromancy.

Millhauser was born in New York City, grew up in Connecticut, and earned a B.A. from Columbia University in 1965. He then pursued a doctorate in English at Brown University. He never completed his dissertation but wrote parts of Edwin Mullhouse and From the Realm of Morpheus in two separate stays at Brown. Between times at the university, he wrote Portrait of a Romantic at his parents’ house in Connecticut. His story “The Invention of Robert Herendeen” (in The Barnum Museum) features a failed student who has moved back in with his parents; the story is loosely based on this period of Millhauser’s life.[1]

Until the Pulitzer Prize, Millhauser was best known for his 1972 debut novel, Edwin Mullhouse. This novel, about a precocious writer whose career ends abruptly with his death at age eleven, features the fictional Jeffrey Cartwright playing Boswell to Edwin’s JohnsonEdwin Mullhouse brought critical acclaim, and Millhauser followed with a second novel, Portrait of a Romantic, in 1977, and his first collection of short stories, In The Penny Arcade, in 1986.

Possibly the most well-known of his short stories is “Eisenheim the Illusionist” (published in “The Barnum Museum”), based on a pseudo-mythical tale of a magician who stunned audiences in Vienna in the latter part of the 19th century. It was made into the film, The Illusionist (2006).[2]

Millhauser’s stories often treat fantasy themes in a manner reminiscent of Poe or Borges, with a distinctively American voice. As critic Russell Potter has noted, “in (Millhauser’s stories), mechanical cowboys at penny arcades come to life; curious amusement parks, museums, or catacombs beckon with secret passageways and walking automata; dreamers dream and children fly out their windows at night on magic carpets.”[3]

Millhauser’s collections of stories continued with The Barnum Museum (1990), Little Kingdoms (1993), and The Knife Thrower and Other Stories (1998). The unexpected success of Martin Dressler in 1997 brought Millhauser increased attention. Dangerous Laughter: Thirteen Stories made the New York Times Book Review list of “10 Best Books of 2008” .[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Millhauser

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Illusionist_(2006_film)

In A Lonely Place (1950) – Ending Scene (3/3)

When he gets home, Dix checks up on Laurel. He finds she is an aspiring actress with only a few low-budget films to her credit. They begin to fall in love and, with Laurel assisting him, Dix finds new energy and goes back to work with enthusiasm, much to his agent’s delight.

Dix remains notoriously erratic, however; sometimes he behaves strangely. He says things that make his agent Mel and Brub’s wife Sylvia (Jeff Donnell) wonder if he did kill the girl. Lochner sows seeds of doubt in Laurel’s mind, pointing out Dix’s long record of violent behavior. When he learns about this, and that Laurel has not told him of her meeting with Lochner, Dix becomes furious and irrational. With her a terrified passenger, he drives at high speed until they sideswipe another car. Nobody is hurt in the collision, but when the other driver accosts him, Dix beats him unconscious and is about to strike him with a large rock when Laurel stops him.

Laurel gets to the point where she cannot sleep without taking pills. Her distrust and fear of Dix are becoming too much for her. When he asks her to marry him, she accepts, but only because she is too scared of what he might do if she’d refused. She secretly makes a plane reservation and tells Mel she is leaving because she cannot take it anymore. Dix finds out and becomes violent, almost strangling her before he regains control of himself. Just then the phone rings. It is Brub with good news: Mildred’s boyfriend (named Henry Kesler, the same as the film’s associate producer) has confessed to her murder. Tragically, it is too late to salvage Dix and Laurel’s relationship.

Cast[edit]

In A Lonely Place (1950) – Police Station Scene (1/3)

In a Lonely Place is a 1950 American film noir directed by Nicholas Ray[2] and starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, produced for Bogart’s Santana Productions. The script was written by Andrew P. Solt from Edmund North’s adaptation of Dorothy B. Hughes‘ 1947 novel of the same name.[3]

Bogart stars as Dixon Steele, a deranged and troubled screenwriter suspected of murder, and Grahame co-stars as Laurel Gray, a neighbor who falls under his spell. Beyond its surface plot of confused identity and tormented love, the story is a mordant comment on Hollywood mores and the pitfalls of celebrity and near-celebrity, similar to two other American films released that same year, Billy Wilder‘s Sunset Boulevard and Joseph L. Mankiewicz‘s All About Eve.

Although lesser known than his other work, Bogart’s performance is considered by many critics to be among his finest and the film’s reputation has grown over time along with Ray’s.[4]

It is now considered a classic film noir, as evidenced by its inclusion on the Time “All-Time 100 List”[5] as well as Slant Magazine‘s “100 Essential Films.”[6] In 2007, In a Lonely Place was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_a_Lonely_Place

I remember once Warren telling me,

Photo courtesy of Kirk Fisher/ Shutterstock.com

after I told him I didn’t know why the person did what they did. He said, “who cares why they did it, you got what you wanted.”

Dear, I couldn’t have gotten my wish any faster. I am glad you’re out there enjoying yourself.

How to Travel Solo on Cruise Lines

Norwegian Cruise Lines was one of the first major cruise lines to accommodate solo travelers. With the launch of its ship the Norwegian Epic, the company began offering solo studio cabins (equipped with queen-size beds) and a solo-only lounge, which gives you a quiet place to hang out and makes it easier to meet other solo travelers.

This experiment by Norwegian Cruise Lines went so well, that the solo studios are the first rooms to sell out on every itinerary. Norwegian has responded by adding solo traveler accommodations to all new ships since then and began retrofitting existing ships with similar setups.

Other cruise lines have followed suit, and solo traveler cabins are now available on many different cruise lines including Royal Caribbean, Holland America, Celebrity, Cunard Line, Costa Cruises, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines, P&O Cruises, and many others. https://millionmilesecrets.com/

Autor/Edición; Eugenio Zorrilla.

Why Do You Feel Butterflies in Your Stomach?

It may have happened when you locked eyes with your secret crush, or before an important job interview, but what exactly caused that strange, fluttering sensation in your stomach?

SciShow