Fink – Move On Me

Early life
Greenall was born 1972 in Cornwall, and grew up in Bristol. Greenall recalls “the one thing of his dad’s that he wasn’t allowed to touch was the old Martin acoustic guitar.” Greenall said “It was his one possession where he said, ‘everything in this house is owned by everybody – apart from that.'”[2] Their presence influenced his future in music. “The great thing about growing up in a house where music is a big factor… was the fact that music being part of your life was a perfectly natural thing.” During his teenage years, he accumulated eclectic musical interests, gravitating towards The Cure, The Smiths, The Orb, African music, and Japanese hardcore before discovering electronic and dance music at University of Leeds.

He earned his degree in History and English at University of Leeds and, with student friends, formed the short-lived dance act EVA, who signed to Kikin’ Records in 1993. For the remainder of the 1990s and much of the early 2000s, Greenall worked in the music industry for various London-based labels, including Virgin’s Source, Def Jam, and Sony. Simultaneously, he pursued a musical career, remixing and producing for various artists, including Ryuichi Sakamoto and Elbow but also as a DJ.[3]

Career

Fink – ‘Perfect Darkness’

Fink’s serious recording career began with Ninja Tune subsidiary N-Tone’s release of his debut single “Fink Funk” in 1997,[4] followed by the album Fresh Produce in 2000, a well received chill-out set that fitted neatly with the output of the label. In the following years, he continued to produce other artists including Martin Taylor, Michael Pitt and Robert Belfour.

Towards the mid-2000s, Greenall developed a disillusionment with dance music and being a DJ, and began to turn to more traditional musical avenues. It was this feeling which resulted in 2006’s Biscuits for Breakfast, the first album to feature current collaborators Guy Whittaker and Tim Thornton, whom Greenall had been friends with for a few years, but did not work with yet. Built around his bluesy voice, finger-picking acoustic guitar and the stripped-back live rhythm section, the self-produced Biscuits boasted a fledgling pop sensibility while retaining some of the signature Ninja Tune sonic hallmarks. He became the label’s first singer/songwriter.[3] The album, along with single “Pretty Little Thing”, helped define his style and began to bring his name to a wider, and higher-profile, audience, notably Zero 7, who invited Fink to support them on their UK tour. Wiki.