Noir Quotes – In a Lonely Place (1950)

Noir Quotes – In a Lonely Place (1950) Dixon Steele (Bogart): I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me. Humphrey Bogart & Gloria Grahame. Selected to the US National Film Registry. IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042593/ HQ Picture: http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/89… Continue reading Noir Quotes – In a Lonely Place (1950)

In a Lonely Place Analysis

“In a Lonely Place” (1950) film analysis. Spoilers. Background Brub (Frank Lovejoy) demonstrates on Sylvia a possible murder method When Edmund H. North adapted the story, he stuck close to the original source and John Derek was considered for the role of Dix because in the novel the character was much younger. North’s treatment was not used. Andrew Solt developed the screenplay with regular input from producer Robert Lord and director Nicholas Ray, and the end result is far different from the source novel. Solt claimed that Bogart loved the script so much that he wanted to make it without revisions 鈥 Solt maintains that the … Continue reading In a Lonely Place Analysis

In A Lonely Place (1950) – Ending Scene (3/3)

When he gets home, Dix checks up on Laurel. He finds she is an aspiring actress with only a few low-budget films to her credit. They begin to fall in love and, with Laurel assisting him, Dix finds new energy and goes back to work with enthusiasm, much to his agent’s delight. Dix remains notoriously erratic, however; sometimes he behaves strangely. He says things that make his agent Mel and Brub’s wife Sylvia (Jeff Donnell) wonder if he did kill the girl. Lochner sows seeds of doubt in Laurel’s mind, pointing out Dix’s long record of violent behavior. When he … Continue reading In A Lonely Place (1950) – Ending Scene (3/3)

In A Lonely Place (1950) – Car Scene (2/3)

Dixon “Dix” Steele (Humphrey Bogart) is a down-on-his-luck Hollywood screenwriter who has not had a hit, “since before the war.” While driving to meet his agent, Mel Lippman (Art Smith), at a nightclub, Dix’s explosive temper is revealed when, at a stoplight, he engages with another motorist in a confrontation that almost becomes violent. At the nightclub, Mel cajoles him to adapt a book for a movie. The hat-check girl, Mildred Atkinson (Martha Stewart), is engrossed in reading the copy meant for Dix; since she only has a few pages left to go, she asks to finish before passing it on to Dix. … Continue reading In A Lonely Place (1950) – Car Scene (2/3)

In A Lonely Place (1950) – Police Station Scene (1/3)

In a Lonely Place is a 1950 American film noir directed by Nicholas Ray[2] and starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, produced for Bogart’s Santana Productions. The script was written by Andrew P. Solt from Edmund North’s adaptation of Dorothy B. Hughes‘ 1947 novel of the same name.[3] Bogart stars as Dixon Steele, a deranged and troubled screenwriter suspected of murder, and Grahame co-stars as Laurel Gray, a neighbor who falls under his spell. Beyond its surface plot of confused identity and tormented love, the story is a mordant comment on Hollywood mores and the pitfalls of celebrity and near-celebrity, similar to two other American films released that same year, Billy Wilder‘s Sunset Boulevard and Joseph L. Mankiewicz‘s All … Continue reading In A Lonely Place (1950) – Police Station Scene (1/3)

Gloria Grahame with Humphrey Bogart, from In A Lonely Place (1950)

Hollywood screenwriter Dixon Steele (Humphrey Bogart) and his neighbor Laurel (Gloria Grahame) are just getting to know each other romantically when the police begin questioning Dixon about his involvement in the murder of a girl he met once. Certain her new love interest is innocent, Laurel stands聽by Dixon, but as the police continue pressing him, Dixon begins to act increasingly erratically. The blossoming love affair suffers as Laurel begins to wonder if Dixon really might be a killer. In a Lonely Place (1950) – Nicholas Ray (whisper) This among many great scenes in Nicholas Ray’s superb film In a Lonely … Continue reading Gloria Grahame with Humphrey Bogart, from In A Lonely Place (1950)